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Training Advice

  • Road Repetitions

  • The early miles

    It takes 10-30 minutes to "get into" a run.

    Early on in a workout you've not found your groove yet. 

    However instead of looking at those first few miles with distain, consider them an insight on how long of a warm up you should be taking before workouts such as track sessions, tempo runs, or races!

    You may also like:
    How to Warm Up

  • How to stay active on vacation

    We asked our Ambassadors for their best advice for staying active while traveling, here's what they had to say. Leave us your favorite advice in the comments section!

    Geoffrey Alonso
    Exercise first. So you have the day to spend doing the fun things.

    Tyler Hurst
    Be selfish and plan your day around your workout. Like Geoffrey said, it's way easier for everyone to do it first.

    Jeremy Sanders
    Use the boardwalk at the beach early in the morning before the bicycle traffic takes over.

    Adam ...

  • How to run Every Day

    Run Streaking is becoming ever more popular.

    Runner's World has a Memorial to Independence Day 1 mile a day streak. And news just came out that the longest known US streak of 45 years is coming to a voluntary end in July.

    There are various reasons for wanting to run every day.

    Maybe you feel this will lead to improvements in your running by having more weekly volume. Perhaps you simply enjoy the feeling after a run and feel like your day is missing something without that. Or maybe your ...

  • Top Training Mistakes

    Your event, be it 26.2 or 3.1 miles, doesn't really care what you did the week before the race.

    It doesn't even worry too much about the two months before that.

    What is is concerned with is your frequency, consistency, and volume of miles over the long term. We're talking months to years. Every day adds up, a marathon is worth more than the sum of its parts. Every little decision matters, and the consistency of positive choices makes a difference when you get to the starting line.

    Training is ...

  • How to Recover from a Hard Run

    Most runners recognize that it's the recovery, not training, that yields improvements.

    There are all kinds of ways to make recovery complicated. Ice bathing, tart cherry juice, the 30 minute window of opportunity, getting in proper nutrient ratios, and even hanging upside down.

    The KISS principle suggests to Keep It Super Simple. The simplest solution is most often the best. When applying this to recovery, you're left with recovery methods of time, sleep, food, and proper pacing of subsequent ...

  • Variety in Running to Lower Overuse Injury

    Many new athletes make the error of lacking variation in their training.

    This can come in the form of wearing the same pair of shoes for every single workout, running on the same terrain all of the time, or training at the same pace for almost every run.

    We'll start with shoes, which us here at SKORA are ever so fond of.

    A recent study determined that athletes who use different shoes for different runs have a 39% lower injury rate than those who used the same shoe for all of their training. ...

  • Winter Running - How & Why


    There is no such thing as bad weather, only inappropriate clothing.
    - British adventurer Ranulph Fiennes

    Before Winter

    Being an endurance athlete in the winter is expensive. You have two options. Either spend the money on a gym membership or purchase cold weather gear. Many may prefer to slowly accumulate winter gear during non winter months. This way less is spent at once and can be picked up through sales. Other than the apparel, there are many other ways you can make winter running more ...

  • What does DOMS really mean?

     

    Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    But it's not quite that simple, there is more to it than that.

    Every sensation your body provides your brain is its way of speaking to you. Telling you something.

    Some runners feel soreness should often be a workout goal. Yet athletes are quick to look for methods to reduce the duration of this soreness so they can get back to training.

    Let us take a quick look into what causes this post workout soreness.

    There are three main explanations.
    1) Microtrauma in ...

  • Take Your Time

    Patience and time do more than strength or passion. -Jean de La Fontaine

    In today's fast paced world, it's often difficult to think long term.

    However one of the best indicators of how successful a person is, no matter the endeavor they choose, is how long they've been at it.

    During my own training and coaching, I practice and advise a much slower and cautious build than many would normally do on their own. This is mainly to avoid injury and maintain as consistent of a running pattern for as ...

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