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  • What to do in the "off-season"

    2014-10-29 09.32.35

    Running is a winter sport that is merely played out in the summer.

    What this means is that the final long run you do 3 weeks out from your marathon that you spend hours trying to decide the distance of matters little.

    The 4 month training plan you do before the A race of the year is important, no doubt. However it still may matter less than what you do during the 4-6 months before that training plan.

    For many, the big off-season question is what the heck should I do?!?

    And that's a completely ...

  • Your next running breakthrough

    It's likely you've had a breakthrough moment in your life.

    This may have occurred in your running, while you were learning a new skill, or at work.

    Whatever the breakthrough was in, you likely did something or changed something before the big development to help trigger the gain. Looking back can be a helpful learning experience for yourself and others who are making strides to improve a similar endeavor.

    Recently at the forums on LetsRun.com, a discussion started on the topic of asking forum ...

  • If You Can't Be Seen, Forget 'bout the Foot Race

    For many runners, summertime is a joy: plenty of warmth, no snow/ice to deal with, and hours upon hours of daylight. When that summer fades into fall and then winter, that light becomes precious. With the ever-increasing darkness each day, staying visible can mean the difference between a successful winter training season and months of forced treadmill time.

    Assume You Can’t Be Seen

    It’s important that runners be aware of how hard they are to spot while out at night. Drivers, distracted ...

  • Treadmill Safety

    "Similarly, persistently running in the same manner reduces the variability of our individual stride "signature." Gradually, structures become overspecialized. When excess monotony, fatigue, soreness or injury reduce our ability to vary aspects of our stride, our capacity to disperse mechanical stress diminishes. Loading stress becomes focused on an ever decreasing set of hot spots on -- bones, tendons and muscles -- and the risk of overuse injuries escalates. Conversely, when our variability ...

  • Socks or No Socks in SKORA?

    A common question we get about our shoes, is about your socks.

    We've designed our footwear to be as seamless and smooth inside as possible, all in an effort to reduce the potential areas for hot spots to develop on your feet.

    This also opens up the possibility to go sockless in our footwear, if one so desires.

    There are a number of benefits to wearing socks, because they may keep the...
    1) shoes cleaner by absorbing sweat.
    2) feet warmer in the winter since they can help insulate.
    3) feet ...

  • Shoes and Injury

    "Are your shoes good for people with heel problems?"

    This is a rather common question asked of us here at SKORA.

    You can replace "heel problems" with shin splints, plantar fasciitis, or any other possible injury.

    Now the answer is, as it usually is, it depends.

    People are often very quick to blame their shoes, and that's understandable. For years shoe companies have been touting their products as a cure-all for any injury. However, it may be the case that most of the time injuries have little ...

  • Road Repetitions

  • To Use Insoles or Not?

    Some runners prefer less. Others, more.

    Some prefer none at all, while even more prefer as much as they can get.

    Whether you prefer your insoles thick or thin, in or out, there’s no question that such a decision is an important one.

    When I was first introduced to SKORA, I couldn’t stand the insole. Coming from nearly two years in those funky toe shoes, the mere 4mm in the SKORA FORM felt squishy and a little bit like cheating. But as I ran more and more and further and further, I came to ...

  • Obstacle Course Racing in SKORA

    Every athlete evolves.

    When I started running 10 years ago, my first run was in street shoes.

    I was a complete novice, but also a quick learner readily listening to my body . And in this case, my feet were telling me “please buy a pair of running shoes.” With little thought, I bought the first pair I saw at the store.

    Not long after lacing up my new sneakers, the evolution continued and I started signing up for trail running races. My love for the sport quickly grew as did the race ...

  • The early miles

    It takes 10-30 minutes to "get into" a run.

    Early on in a workout you've not found your groove yet. 

    However instead of looking at those first few miles with distain, consider them an insight on how long of a warm up you should be taking before workouts such as track sessions, tempo runs, or races!

    You may also like:
    How to Warm Up

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